GonzoFest 2018 Literary Journalism Contest

Reposting from LibraryJournal

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Together with the Louisville Public Library and BiblioBoard, We’re celebrating the national expansion of the GonzoFest Literary Contest — and invite all public libraries, their independent authors, and writer communities to enter a single piece of literary nonfiction journalism in the tradition of the late Hunter S. Thompson.

Has there ever been a more suitable time than 2018 for fire-honed and razor-edged journalism in the tradition of the late Hunter S. Thompson?

To encourage such work, and to honor our hometown hero Thompson’s memory, the directors of the annual GonzoFest Louisville event invite writers and artists from all corners of the world to enter a single piece of literary nonfiction journalism and art of any kind to enter this year’s literary and art contests.

There is no type of story preferred over another — so long as it’s true, and interesting. The emphasis will be on the quality of the writing, and the significance of the story it tells.

Entries between 1,250 and 2,000 words are encouraged. They must be unpublished non-fiction, based on the author’s original reporting, observations or insights. Please include a cover page containing the author’s name, address, and contact information — as well as a brief statement attesting to the entry’s originality.

Entries must be submitted via the Literary Contest Portal.
All 2018 literary submissions are due by 11:59 p.m. EDT on March 28, 2018.

Link for submitting 

The winning entry will be considered for publication in the GonzoFest edition of the Louisville Eccentric Observer, Louisville’s venerable alternative weekly.  The author will also be honored during the festival, and receive a $1,000 cash prize, thanks to contest sponsor BiblioBoard. BiblioBoard is a community engagement platform for libraries, helping the library connect with and distribute works from local writers, journalists, musicians, artists, filmmakers and other cultural partners.  Also supporting the contest as BiblioBoard’s Media Partner is Library Journal, which will feature the winning entry on its website.  Library Journal is the most trusted and respected publication for the library community.

The judges, which include prominent journalists from across the U.S. and Europe, encourage work that is reported with a keen eye for detail and written in a bold and elegant style, as Thompson’s best work was. The judges for 2018 will be posted soon.

Questions: 

Michael Lindenberger
Gonzo Festival Literary Contest coordinator
The Dallas Morning News
mlindenberger@dallasnews.com.

Gonzo Gallery and Thomas W. Benton Update

Hi folks,

First of all a belated Happy New Year to you all! Lets hope 2014 is a good one to everybody.

I know updates have been few and far between in recent months, which is due to the amount of PhD related work that I have been wading through. As my thesis is now in the final stretches I hope to be able to devote a little more time to the site this year, not to mention finally finish that damn PhD once and for all.

Anyway, I have been in touch with DJ Watkins recently and he was kind enough to update me on changes to the official Gonzo Gallery and Tom Benton websites.

Here is what he had to say:

The Gonzo Gallery is now officially broadcasting from www.gonzogallery.com. Artwork by the usual cast of characters – Thomas W. Benton, Ralph Steadman, Hunter S. Thompson, and William S. Burroughs – is now online including work that’s never been available for purchase before. 
 
We also decided to leave behind the old Thomas W. Benton website and showcase his work in a lavishly post-modern style at www.tomwbenton.com. Unlike our previous, quasi-analog site, you can actually purchase original prints and paintings now.  
 
And if two new websites weren’t enough, curators, important curators, who stand as pillars of artistic acumen have chosen to include The Gonzo Museum in the Art Genome Project (Think Pandora for artwork) and feature the Museum on their website Artsy. Thus, Gonzo joins the illustrious ranks of The Getty and The Guggenheim in the annals of art history proving that savage genius will survive in an era of reality television and Snapchat. 
I have said it before and I will happily say it again – DJ Watkins has really done a sterling job on the above. Delighted to hear about the Art Genome Project and it is a testament to the fine job he has done in bringing the collections into the digital age. A lot of this material would be simply unavailable to people if it wasn’t for DJ and his dedication. He also has some more plans in store for 2014 so stay tuned to find out more.
All the best,
Rory

The Gonzo Museum

Hi guys,

First post of 2013 and a long overdue one at that! Some of you will recall the review I posted a while back of Thomas Benton: Artist/Activist by DJ Watkins which I thoroughly recommended at the time as an excellent addition to any Gonzo library. Well DJ Watkins didn’t just finish there and has since established The Gonzo Museum in Aspen. Check out the videos below to see the excellent museum that he has managed to put together. An absolute must see for any Gonzo fiend that finds themselves in that neck of the woods! If you are lucky enough to get to see this, make sure to tell the folks there that you heard about it at Totallygonzo. I promise they won’t run you out of the building.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2x-FT0UUqI]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCGaRwgpXxI]

All the best,

Rory

July 18 – Happy Birthday HST

 I always figured I would live on the margins of society, part of a very small Outlaw segment.

–  Dr. Hunter S. Thompson (July 18, 1937 – Feb 20, 2005)

The Outsider’s case against society is very clear. All men and women have these dangerous, unnameable impulses, yet they keep up a pretence, to themselves, to others; their respectability, their philosophy, their religion, are all attempts to gloss over, to make look civilized and rational something that is savage, unorganized, irrational. He is an Outsider because he stands for Truth.

– Colin Wilson The Outsider

GONZO READING PROJECT PRESENTS…

An unabridged live reading of “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: a Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream” By Hunter S. Thompson

Aspen— Hunter S. Thompson very much enjoyed hearing his work read out loud and in the moment. It could be an older piece or something new. Reading aloud made the writing come alive.

In that spirit and to celebrate what would be the journalist’s 75th birthday, The Gonzo Reading Project is hosting a continuous reading of “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas” on Saturday, July 14th. at The Hotel Jerome in Aspen, Colorado. The live performance project is scheduled to begin atnoon and take about seven hours—depending upon circumstances.

Friends from far and wide will gather to participate and read at one the iconic institutions in Gonzo literature.

“Slower,” Hunter would inevitably say to the reader. He wrote his work to have a certain cadence, and he liked to hear every comma. If you are interested in reading a part of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas please email: info@gonzoreadingproject.com.

Will you buy the ticket and take the ride? Are you ready to read?
WHAT: Unabridged live reading of “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: a Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream” By: Hunter S. Thompson

WHO: The Gonzo Reading Project, Friends and Family of the late Hunter S. Thompson

WHERE: The Hotel Jerome’s Green Library, Fat City, USA

WHEN: Saturday, July 14, 2012 at High Noon

 

You can also watch the event on a live webcast at the following link: –  http://www.ustream.tv/channel/gonzo-reading-project 

 

Many thanks to the folks over at The Gonzo Reading Project for the info.

 

All the best,

 

Rory

Dr. Hunter S. Thompson Bulletin Board & All Nite Shooting Range

Hi guys,

As some of have noticed the HST Bulletin Board has vanished from the net in recent times. Unfortunately nobody appears to know why, much less know how to contact the people behind that odd corner of the internet.

So if anyone out there is in the know, can you please email me totallygonzo@gmail.com and hopefully we can get the board back online.

It would be a shame to see it vanish into the ether.

Rory

Review – Thomas W. Benton: Artist/Activist

Thomas W. Benton: Artist/Activist 

This stunning coffee-table compilation of Tom Benton’s art is a treasure trove of material that is of huge significance to not only political art history, but also the history of Gonzo Journalism.

Many of you are of course already familiar with Benton through his collaboration with Hunter S. Thompson on the Aspen Wallposters and his striking skull design for the cover of Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail ’72. Yet to date Benton’s work has remained largely inaccessible, with the Aspen Wallposters proving to be particularly elusive due to their scarcity and the high price that they command on the rare occasion that they become available on the market.

Since I started this website just over three years ago, I have been inundated with enquiries regarding the Aspen Wallposters. I think it is fair to say that Benton has been criminally overlooked, not just in relation to his collaboration with Hunter S. Thompson, but also in terms of his contribution to protest art and political activism both at a local and national level.

In this sense, full credit must go to Daniel J. Watkins for undertaking the mammoth project of cataloguing over 500 pieces of art spanning five decades of Benton’s career, a task that involved traversing the length and breadth of the country in search of these prints, all of which were produced in limited unnumbered runs. No mean feat.

From this wider collection, Watkins has selected 150 prints divided into sections representing the evolution of Benton’s career, from his first posters as advertisements for various businesses and events in Aspen, through his political activism and collaboration with Hunter S. Thompson, to his later foray into abstract monotypes and oil paintings. The final section showcases the four buildings that Benton designed and built in Aspen.

Considering that my knowledge of art is fairly limited, I must admit that my initial interest in this book was based solely on the fact that the Aspen Wallposters were finally going to be widely available to the Gonzo community. In many ways they remained one of the final pieces of the Gonzo jigsaw that had yet to fall into place, which is pretty remarkable given the prominent role they have played in relation to Thompson’s infamous Campaign for Sheriff of Aspen, as detailed in his Rolling Stone article The Battle of Aspen – Freak Power in the Rockies. However, the influence of Benton upon Thompson, and vice versa, goes far beyond this collaboration, a fact that is evident from the very first image presented in this book – A stark ,volatile, grey and white print emblazoned with the words – ‘The Garden of Agony – Abandon All Hope Ye Who Enter Here.’ The footnote informs us that ‘The Garden of Agony’ was the name of Benton’s studio.

Any doubt that Benton was cut from the very same cloth as Thompson, certainly in a political and philosophical manner, are firmly laid to rest by the inclusion of Peggy Clifford’s excellent interview with Benton at the beginning of this book. When asked about his thoughts on American people in general, Benton replied – ‘Most of them are robots. When I go to Los Angeles and I see those people content with smog and congestion and not rebelling, I have to think they they’ve been brainwashed.’ On his opinion of the corporate interests taking over Aspen he states – ‘I think they are going to win. I’m a pessimist, but I’m not a pacifist. I think you ought to take your cuts at them. If you’re going to go down, go down fighting.’

 Given the deep affection for Aspen that was central to Benton’s creative drive it is unsurprising that he found the perfect platform of expression through the medium of campaign posters centred on local politics (and later on a national level). What is intriguing about many of these posters is the manner through which Benton’s aesthetic approach integrated political slogans with powerful visual symbols of the natural beauty of the Aspen wilderness. Of course there are exceptions, such as his poster for the Woody Creek Caucus which is emblazoned with one of the greatest political slogans I have ever seen (the hallmark of a certain Doctor that lived there).

Indeed it is of course the Gonzo section of the book that showcases the most recognisable aspect of Benton’s political art. The content included here is a rare treat for any fan of Hunter S. Thompson with the aforementioned Aspen Wallposters taking centre stage (all of which fold-out from the book). Their inclusion marks the first time that all six posters, each including Thompson’s writing on the reverse, have been made available since the original run of prints in 1970. I don’t want to spoil the details so all I will say is that the posters and accompanying text is pure vintage Gonzo at its best. To finally have this material is to fill a gap in the Gonzo narrative that has been there for far too long. Yet this is not the only Gonzo material that Watkins has included here, with an original voter registration poster for the Thompson for Sheriff campaign also featured, together with an article from The Aspen Times on the “Scurrilous Sheet” by Benton and Thompson and finally the two-page advertisement from Scanlan’s magazine in relation the ill-fated Nixon Wallposter.

 Benton’s collaboration with Thompson on the Aspen Wallposters appears to have been a seminal event in his artistic development, certainly in terms of influence carried forward in relation to his political art. The activism section of the book clearly illustrates this, with many of Benton’s prints echoing his work with Thompson, which is perhaps facilitated by the subject matter – a thorough disdain for Richard Nixon and American foreign policy.

 Overall this book is a testament to a man who not just embodied artistic vision, but who also had the courage and the passion to use his gift to make his feelings known in a world where speaking up is frequently rewarded with being shot down. Benton’s art tells a story, not just about a single cause or person, it is multi-faceted – at once portrait of a life, a city and a nation.

EDIT: You can buy the book here.

Happy Birthday Hunter

Today would have been Hunter’s 74th birthday. No matter what way you are marking the day, don’t forget the words, have a toast and most importantly – Have fun! If the celebrations get a little out of hand, here is some advice from the Good Doctor which might prove useful:

“When you push a car off a cliff and blow it up, be sure to roll the windows down to avoid shrapnel. Also, strip the license plate so you’re not billed for the cleanup.”  

Wise words indeed 😉

R

Rory

UPDATE: Check this out, courtesy of the guys at Flying Dog.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nYaSuYwr7o]